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The Apiary Studio

Explorations & Inspirations | Emily Utz

moma:

Music inspired by paintings, including works in MoMA’s collection by Van Gogh, Matisse, and Miro. http:// 
[Joan Miró. The Beautiful Bird Revealing the Unknown to a Pair of Lovers (from the Constellation series). July 23, 1941.]

moma:

Music inspired by paintings, including works in MoMA’s collection by Van Gogh, Matisse, and Miro.

[Joan MiróThe Beautiful Bird Revealing the Unknown to a Pair of Lovers (from the Constellation series). July 23, 1941.]

(via artistjournals)

What in your life is calling you,
when all the noise is silenced,
the meetings adjourned,
the lists laid aside,
and the wild Iris blooms
by itself
in the dark forest,
what still pulls on your soul?

—Rumi  (via myworldmyhermitage)

(Source: jesoutiensque, via artpropelled)

Please keep demonstrating the courage that it takes to swim upstream in a world that prefers putting away for retirement to putting pen to paper, that chooses practicality over poetry, that values you more for going to the gym than going to the deepest places in your soul. Please keep making your art for people like me, people who need the magic and imagination and honesty of great art to make the day-to-day world a little more bearable.

—Shauna Niequist (via artpropelled)

I realize things have been quiet here at The Apiary Studio tumblr.  I’ve been a busy bee, but am working on an art journal that I don’t want to share with the world.  I have been, from time to time, collecting inspirations over at my other tumblr, Emily’s Reblog, where I don’t post original content, just amass the wonderful images floating around out there.

I been crafty.

I been crafty.

All you have to do is say “yes.” Don’t make some big project out of it. Don’t make some big deal out of it. Just say “yes.” You don’t even know what it means to say “yes,” but you say it anyway. You’ll never know what it means to say “yes,” but you do it anyway. Freedom and Love arise when you die into the unknown mystery of being.

—Adyashanti (via ashramof1)

(via wordhaven)

Oh my god.

Oh my god.

(Source: sonrisadeungramo, via wordhaven)

Kuba cloth patterns.  I have been utterly taken by these since I first encountered them in an outdoor market in Nairobi.  I went through the somewhat painful process of haggling in order to take one home.  I never know what to do with the one I have - it’s roughly 6’ x 2’, but I sometimes can’t stop thinking about it, the shapes have such power in them.

tar-feathers:

Hannah Lamb - postcards from Saltaire


I love these.  Love the word “cyanotype,” too.

tar-feathers:

Hannah Lamb - postcards from Saltaire

I love these. Love the word “cyanotype,” too.

(Source: plumes-feathers, via thepoetryofmaterialthings)

Working on a new series: Being Seen.  These are inspirations from my friend Jamie Emerick.

Distant relations.  (Estelle Thompson & Cy Twombly).

Oh, Estelle.  How did you know?

And suddenly, I was on to watercolor …

These inspirations are the work of Sean Scully.  Bless his overcast Irish heart.

The first two are by contemporary British artist Anish Kapoor. They stopped my mind when I came across them on the De Young museum’s website. The third photo is of an exercise I did in Joan’s class a year ago or more: we were instructed to draw a single shape - any shape - onto a large piece of canvas hung on the wall. Once the line was irrevocably committed to the space, we were told to re-draw over it non-stop for 30 minutes.

Something happened to my mind and my hand-arm-body in that relaxing, repetitive vortex. I’m not sure I can say what, especially with just the memory to go on, but it was instantly triggered again by the appearance of Kapoor’s drawings on my screen last night. Whatever it is lives in me now, forever, and is also apparently part of the shared experience of many fellow humans across time and space.

Via Brené Brown’s blog I was introduced to Kal Barteski, who makes these AWESOME awesome posters.  It seemed no coincidence that chance would put me in touch with a contemporary artist who is a mother and a success and someone who uses text as much as images in her work.

I had been looking deeply into Cy Twombly’s groundbreaking use of writing and “writing-like marks,” as Joan calls them, in his paintings.  I plan to try making some of these You Are Awesome poster-paintings myself for friends and loved ones this Winter.  I can’t wait for the bold colors on my brush and the black silhouettes. It’ll be a good way to practice brush work, which I haven’t done much of.

Nº. 1 of  11